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yml-org/YCoreUI 1.2.1
Core components for iOS and tvOS to accelerate building user interfaces in code.
⭐️ 6
🕓 1 week ago
iOS tvOS
.package(url: "https://github.com/yml-org/YCoreUI.git", from: "1.2.1")

Y-CoreUI
Core components for iOS to accelerate building user interfaces in code.

This lightweight framework primarily comprises:

  • UIView extensions for declarative Auto Layout
  • UIColor extensions for WCAG 2.0 contrast ratio calculations
  • (iOS only) UIScrollView extensions to assist with keyboard avoidance

It also contains miscellaneous other Foundation and UIKit extensions.

Documentation

Documentation is automatically generated from source code comments and rendered as a static website hosted via GitHub Pages at: https://yml-org.github.io/YCoreUI/

Usage

1. UIView extensions for declarative Auto Layout

To aid in auto layout, Y—CoreUI has several UIView extensions that simplify creating layout constraints. These do not use any 3rd party library such as SnapKit, but are simply wrappers around Apple’s own NSLayoutConstraint api’s. If you are more comfortable using Apple’s layout constraint api’s natively, then by all means go ahead and use them. But these convenience methods allow for less verbose code that expresses its intent more directly.

All the extensions are to UIView and begin with the word constrain.

The simplest flavor just creates constraints using attributes just like the original iOS 6 NSLayoutContraint api.

// constrain a button's width to 100
let button = UIButton()
addSubview(button)
button.constrain(.width, constant: 100)

// constrain view to superview
let container = UIView()
addSubview(container)
container.constrain(.leading, to: .leading, of: superview)
container.constrain(.trailing, to: .trailing, of: superview)
container.constrain(.top, to: .top, of: superview)
container.constrain(.bottom, to: .bottom, of: superview)

Another flavor creates constraints using anchors just like the anchor api’s first introduced in iOS 9.

// constrain a button's width to 100
let button = UIButton()
addSubview(button)
button.constrain(.widthAnchor, constant: 100) 

// constrain view to superview
let container = UIView()
addSubview(container)
container.constrain(.leadingAnchor, to: leadingAnchor)
container.constrain(.trailingAnchor, to: trailingAnchor)
container.constrain(.topAnchor, to: topAnchor)
container.constrain(.bottomAnchor, to: bottomAnchor)

There are overrides to handle the common use case of placing one view below another or to the trailing side of another:

// constrain button2.leadingAnchor to button1.trailingAnchor
button2.constrain(after: button1, offset: insets.leading)

// constrain label2.topAnchor to label1.bottomAnchor
label2.constrain(below: label1, offset: gap)

But where these extensions really shine are the constrainEdges methods that create up to four constraints with a single method call.

// constrain 2 buttons across in a view
let button1 = UIButton()
let button2 = UIButton()
let insets = NSDirectionalEdgeInsets(top: 16, leading: 16, bottom: 16, trailing: 16)
addSubview(button1)
addSubview(button2)

button1.constrainEdges(.notTrailing, with: insets)
button2.constrainEdges(.notLeading, with: insets)
button2.constrain(after: button1, offset: insets.leading)
button1.constrain(.widthAnchor, to: button2.widthAnchor)

// constrain view to superview
let container = UIView()
addSubview(container)
container.constrainEdges()

There’s also a constrainEdgesToMargins variant that sets constraints between the recipient’s edges and the layout margins of the specified view (typically the recipient’s superview). This is very handy for avoiding safe areas such as the region occupied by the navigation bar or by the FaceID notch.

// constrain 2 buttons across in a view using margins
let button1 = UIButton()
let button2 = UIButton()
let spacing: CGFloat = 16
addSubview(button1)
addSubview(button2)

button1.constrainEdgesToMargins(.notTrailing)
button2.constrainEdgesToMargins(.notLeading)
button2.constrain(after: button1, offset: spacing)
button1.constrain(.widthAnchor, to: button2.widthAnchor)

// constrain view to superview margins
let container = UIView()
addSubview(container)
container.constrainEdgesToMargins()

2. UIColor extensions for WCAG 2.0 contrast ratio calculations

Y—CoreUI contains a number of extensions to make working with colors easier. The most useful of them may be WCAG 2.0 contrast calculations. Given any two colors (representing foreground and background colors), you can calculate the contrast ration between them and evaluate whether that passes particular WCAG 2.0 standards (AA or AAA). You can even write unit tests to quickly check all color pairs in your app across all color modes. That could look like this:

final class ColorsTests: XCTestCase {
    typealias ColorInputs = (foreground: UIColor, background: UIColor, context: WCAGContext)

    // These pairs should pass WCAG 2.0 AA
    let colorPairs: [ColorInputs] = [
        // label on system background
        (.label, .systemBackground, .normalText),
        // label on secondary background
        (.label, .secondarySystemBackground, .normalText),
        // label on tertiary background
        (.label, .tertiarySystemBackground, .normalText),
        // secondary label on system background
        (.secondaryLabel, .systemBackground, .normalText),
        // secondary label on secondary background
        (.secondaryLabel, .secondarySystemBackground, .normalText),
        // secondary label on tertiary background
        (.secondaryLabel, .tertiarySystemBackground, .normalText),
        // tertiary label on system background
        (.tertiaryLabel, .systemBackground, .normalText),
        // tertiary label on secondary background
        (.tertiaryLabel, .secondarySystemBackground, .normalText),
        // tertiary label on tertiary background
        (.tertiaryLabel, .tertiarySystemBackground, .normalText),

        // system red on system background (fails)
        // (.systemRed, .systemBackground, .normalText),
    ]

    let allColorSpaces: [UITraitCollection] = [
        // Light Mode
        UITraitCollection(userInterfaceStyle: .light),
        // Light Mode, Increased Contrast
        UITraitCollection(traitsFrom: [
            UITraitCollection(userInterfaceStyle: .light),
            UITraitCollection(accessibilityContrast: .high)
        ]),
        // Dark Mode
        UITraitCollection(userInterfaceStyle: .dark),
        // Dark Mode, Increased Contrast
        UITraitCollection(traitsFrom: [
            UITraitCollection(userInterfaceStyle: .dark),
            UITraitCollection(accessibilityContrast: .high)
        ])
    ]

    func testColorContrast() {
        // test across all color modes we support
        for traits in allColorSpaces {
            // test each color pair
            colorPairs.forEach {
                let color1 = $0.foreground.resolvedColor(with: traits)
                let color2 = $0.background.resolvedColor(with: traits)

                XCTAssertTrue(
                    color1.isSufficientContrast(to: color2, context: $0.context, level: .AA),
                    String(
                        format: "#%@ vs #%@ ratio = %.02f under %@ Mode%@",
                        color1.rgbDisplayString(),
                        color2.rgbDisplayString(),
                        color1.contrastRatio(to: color2),
                        traits.userInterfaceStyle == .dark ? "Dark" : "Light",
                        traits.accessibilityContrast == .high ? " Increased Contrast" : ""
                    )
                )
            }
        }
    }
}

3. UIScrollView extensions to assist with keyboard avoidance

FormViewController

FormViewController is a view controller with a scrollable content area that will automatically avoid the keyboard for you. It is a good choice for views that have inputs (e.g. login or onboarding). Even for views without inputs, it is still quite useful for managing the creation of a UIScrollView and a contentView set within it, so that you can focus on your content and not have to code a scrollView for every view.

UIScrollview Extensions

Want to have a scrollview that avoids the keyboard, but you can’t use FormViewController? Most of its functionality is a simple extension to UIScrollView. You can add keyboard avoidance to any scroll view like so:

scrollView.registerKeyboardNotifications()

Installation

You can add Y-CoreUI to an Xcode project by adding it as a package dependency.

  1. From the File menu, select Add Packages...
  2. Enter "https://github.com/yml-org/YCoreUI" into the package repository URL text field
  3. Click Add Package

Contributing to Y-CoreUI

Requirements

SwiftLint (linter)

brew install swiftlint

Jazzy (documentation)

sudo gem install jazzy

Setup

Clone the repo and open Package.swift in Xcode.

Versioning strategy

We utilize semantic versioning.

{major}.{minor}.{patch}

e.g.

1.0.5

Branching strategy

We utilize a simplified branching strategy for our frameworks.

  • main (and development) branch is main
  • both feature (and bugfix) branches branch off of main
  • feature (and bugfix) branches are merged back into main as they are completed and approved.
  • main gets tagged with an updated version # for each release

Branch naming conventions:

feature/{ticket-number}-{short-description}
bugfix/{ticket-number}-{short-description}

e.g.

feature/CM-44-button
bugfix/CM-236-textview-color

Pull Requests

Prior to submitting a pull request you should:

  1. Compile and ensure there are no warnings and no errors.
  2. Run all unit tests and confirm that everything passes.
  3. Check unit test coverage and confirm that all new / modified code is fully covered.
  4. Run swiftlint from the command line and confirm that there are no violations.
  5. Run jazzy from the command line and confirm that you have 100% documentation coverage.
  6. Consider using git rebase -i HEAD~{commit-count} to squash your last {commit-count} commits together into functional chunks.
  7. If HEAD of the parent branch (typically main) has been updated since you created your branch, use git rebase main to rebase your branch.
    • Never merge the parent branch into your branch.
    • Always rebase your branch off of the parent branch.

When submitting a pull request:

  • Use the provided pull request template and populate the Introduction, Purpose, and Scope fields at a minimum.
  • If you're submitting before and after screenshots, movies, or GIF's, enter them in a two-column table so that they can be viewed side-by-side.

When merging a pull request:

  • Make sure the branch is rebased (not merged) off of the latest HEAD from the parent branch. This keeps our git history easy to read and understand.
  • Make sure the branch is deleted upon merge (should be automatic).

Releasing new versions

  • Tag the corresponding commit with the new version (e.g. 1.0.5)
  • Push the local tag to remote

Generating Documentation (via Jazzy)

You can generate your own local set of documentation directly from the source code using the following command from Terminal:

jazzy

This generates a set of documentation under /docs. The default configuration is set in the default config file .jazzy.yaml file.

To view additional documentation options type:

jazzy --help

A GitHub Action automatically runs each time a commit is pushed to main that runs Jazzy to generate the documentation for our GitHub page at: https://yml-org.github.io/YCoreUI/

GitHub

link
Stars: 6
Last commit: 1 week ago
jonrohan Something's broken? Yell at me @ptrpavlik. Praise and feedback (and money) is also welcome.

Release Notes

1.2.1
1 week ago

What's Changed

Full Changelog: https://github.com/yml-org/YCoreUI/compare/1.2.0...1.2.1

Swiftpack is being maintained by Petr Pavlik | @ptrpavlik | @swiftpackco | API | Analytics