Swiftpack.co -  traderepublic/SectionKit as Swift Package
Swiftpack.co is a collection of thousands of indexed Swift packages. Search packages.
traderepublic/SectionKit
♻️ Reusable sections for UICollectionView
.package(url: "https://github.com/traderepublic/SectionKit.git", from: "1.1.0")

SectionKit

Unit Tests SwiftPM compatible Carthage compatible Release

By using SectionKit each section in a UICollectionView is implemented separately, so you can keep your classes small and maintainable. Sections can be combined like building blocks and creating screens with otherwise complex datasources becomes manageable.

At Trade Republic we are using SectionKit extensively. It powers most of our screens, with some of them containing up to 30 different types of sections. By combining SectionKit with ReactiveSwift and a reactive network protocol we are able to provide truly dynamic experiences.

This library is inspired by IGListKit, but it is implemented in Swift and it offers a type safe API through the use of generics.

To see SectionKit in action please check out the example project.

Contents:

Installation

Swift Package Manager

Automatically in Xcode:

  • Click File > Swift Packages > Add Package Dependency...
  • Use the package URL https://github.com/traderepublic/SectionKit to add SectionKit/DiffingSectionKit to your project.

Manually in your Package.swift file:

On the package:

dependencies: [
    .package(name: "SectionKit", url: "https://github.com/traderepublic/SectionKit", from: "1.0.0")
]

On a target:

dependencies: [
    .product(name: "SectionKit", package: "SectionKit"),
    .product(name: "DiffingSectionKit", package: "SectionKit") // optionally, includes diffing via DifferenceKit
]

Carthage

Add this to your Cartfile:

github "traderepublic/SectionKit" ~> 1.0

Note: Since the xcframework variant of DifferenceKit is linked against, make sure to build Carthage dependencies using the --use-xcframeworks option. For more information please visit the Carthage repository.

Quick Start

To get started, we need to initialise a CollectionViewAdapter. That object handles the communication to and from the UICollectionView. Since we want to have multiple sections we'll use the ListCollectionViewAdapter, but if there would only be a single section we could also use the SingleSectionCollectionViewAdapter.

Code
import SectionKit

final class MyCollectionViewController: UIViewController {
    private var collectionViewAdapter: CollectionViewAdapter!

    private let collectionView = UICollectionView(
        frame: .zero, 
        collectionViewLayout: UICollectionViewFlowLayout()
    )

    override func loadView() {
        view = collectionView
    }

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        collectionViewAdapter = ListCollectionViewAdapter(
            viewController: self, 
            collectionView: collectionView,
            dataSource: self // no worries, we're going to add conformance to the protocol in a bit
        )
    }
}

In this example we're going to have two sections and we'll now define their respective models FirstSectionModel and SecondSectionModel:

Code
struct FirstSectionModel {
    let items = ["Hello", "world"]
}

struct SecondSectionModel {
    let item = "Single item"
}

The next thing we want to do is to implement their corresponding SectionController. In this example, the first section shows a list of strings and the second section shows a single string. For both cases there are base classes we can inherit from:

Code
class FirstSectionController: ListSectionController<FirstSectionModel, String> {
    override func items(for model: FirstSectionModel) -> [String] {
        model.items
    }

    override func cellForItem(at indexPath: SectionIndexPath, in context: CollectionViewContext) -> UICollectionViewCell {
        // cell types are automatically registered when dequeuing
        let cell = context.dequeueReusableCell(StringCell.self, for: indexPath)
        cell.label.text = items[indexPath]
        return cell
    }

    override func sizeForItem(at indexPath: SectionIndexPath, using layout: UICollectionViewLayout, in context: CollectionViewContext) -> CGSize {
        CGSize(width: context.containerSize.width, height: 50)
    }
}

class SecondSectionController: SingleItemSectionController<SecondSectionModel, String> {
    override func item(for model: SecondSectionModel) -> String? {
        model.item
    }

    override func cellForItem(at indexPath: SectionIndexPath, in context: CollectionViewContext) -> UICollectionViewCell {
        // cell types are automatically registered when dequeuing
        let cell = context.dequeueReusableCell(StringCell.self, for: indexPath)
        cell.label.text = item
        return cell
    }

    override func sizeForItem(at indexPath: SectionIndexPath, using layout: UICollectionViewLayout, in context: CollectionViewContext) -> CGSize {
        CGSize(width: context.containerSize.width, height: 50)
    }
}

At last we want to implement the ListCollectionViewAdapterDataSource protocol. Here we're providing the SectionController for each model.

The sections both need a unique identifier, so the underlying SectionController can be recycled, which is necessary for animating updates.

Please note: Although the identifier needs to be unique across the list of sections, it also needs to be persistent across updates so the previous SectionController can be reused.

Code

enum MyCollectionSectionId: Hashable {
    case first
    case second
}

protocol MyCollectionSection {
    var sectionId: MyCollectionSectionId { get }
}

extension FirstSectionModel: MyCollectionSection {
    var sectionId: MyCollectionSectionId { .first }
}

extension SecondSectionModel: MyCollectionSection {
    var sectionId: MyCollectionSectionId { .second }
}

extension MyCollectionViewController: ListCollectionViewAdapterDataSource {
    // this can be implemented in a viewmodel instead
    private func createSectionModels() -> [MyCollectionSection] {
        [FirstSectionModel(), SecondSectionModel()]
    }

    func sections(for adapter: CollectionViewAdapter) -> [Section] {
        createSectionModels().compactMap {
            switch $0 {
            case let model as FirstSectionModel:
                return Section(
                    id: model.sectionId,
                    model: model,
                    controller: FirstSectionController(model: model)
                )

            case let model as SecondSectionModel:
                return Section(
                    id: model.sectionId,
                    model: model,
                    controller: SecondSectionController(model: model)
                )

            default:
                assertionFailure("\(#function): unknown section model: \($0)")
                return nil
            }
        }
    }
}

That's it! Since both sections are completely decoupled from each other, they can be easily reused in other places in the app and writing unit tests becomes much easier!

As a final bonus, if you want animated updates, you can use the DiffingListSectionController (import DiffingSectionKit) instead of the "normal" ListSectionController. If you're running iOS 13+ you may also use the FoundationDiffingListSectionController that is already contained in the SectionKit module.

GitHub

link
Stars: 36
Last commit: 1 week ago

Ad: Job Offers

iOS Software Engineer @ Perry Street Software
Perry Street Software is Jack’d and SCRUFF. We are two of the world’s largest gay, bi, trans and queer social dating apps on iOS and Android. Our brands reach more than 20 million members worldwide so members can connect, meet and express themselves on a platform that prioritizes privacy and security. We invest heavily into SwiftUI and using Swift Packages to modularize the codebase.

Submit a free job ad (while I'm testing this). The analytics numbers for this website are here.

Dependencies

Release Notes

1.1
1 week ago
  • Fix version of SwiftPM integration in Readme (#82)
  • Convert the colors example to the MVC architecture (#83)
  • Add Equatable conformance to Error (#85)

Swiftpack is being maintained by Petr Pavlik | @ptrpavlik | @swiftpackco | API | Analytics