Package -

create-universal-package

build status npm version

A toolchain for developing universal (Node.js and browser) JavaScript packages.

Installation

npm i create-universal-package --save-dev

Usage

  Usage: cup [options] [command]

  Commands:

    build, b     Build your package
    build-tests  Build your tests
    clean, c     Clean build artifacts
    help         Display help

  Options:

    -h, --help     Output usage information
    -v, --version  Output the version number

Tests

Any .js files at the root of any __tests__ directory will be added to the test bundle. For browser-only test files you can place them at the root of any __tests__/__browser__ directory. This also works for node-only tests and __tests__/__node_

Globals

__NODE__ and __BROWSER__

Aliases for either true or false depending on the build target. Use this in conjunction with conditionals to check for environment, and dead code will automatically be eliminated appropriately.

For linting purposes, __BROWSER__ and/or __NODE__ conditional checks establish appropriate environment globals. For example:

process.title; // fails `cup/no-undef`
window.location; // fails `cup/no-undef`

// passes lint
if (__BROWSER__) {
  document.body.appendChild(document.createTextNode('hello world'));
}

// passes lint
if (__NODE__) {
  process.stdout.write('hello world');
}

// passes lint
const topLevel = __BROWSER__ ? window : global;

By default, only universal globals (e.g. setTimeout and console) are set everywhere.

__DEV__

Alias for process.env.NODE_ENV !== 'production'. By convention, it is assumed that module consumers are statically inlining the value of process.env.NODE_ENV in browser bundles.

Dependencies

create-universal-package sets pureExternalModules: true in Rollup to prune unused imports in scenarios like the following:

import doNodeThing from 'some-package';

export function foo() {
  console.log('foo');
  if (__NODE__) {
    doNodeThing();
  }
}
Node.js result
import doNodeThing from 'some-package';

export function foo() {
  console.log('foo');
  doNodeThing();
}
Browser result
export function foo() {
  console.log('foo');
}

Notice how the some-package import gets eliminated from the browser result. This is what we want, but keep in mind any dependencies that perform side effects when imported could be eliminated.

Github

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