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lukeredpath/swift-responsive-textfield
A SwiftUI wrapper around UITextField with binding-based state and responder control
.package(url: "https://github.com/lukeredpath/swift-responsive-textfield.git", from: "0.5.2")

ResponsiveTextField - a better SwiftUI text field

CI GitHub license

This library aims to achieve one goal, which is provide a reasonably flexible and useful SwiftUI wrapper around UITextField that provides more control over it's first responder status, one of the most glaring omissions from SwiftUI's native TextField even in iOS 14.

Features

At a high level, it provides the ability to:

  • Use of SwiftUI bindings to capture entered text and control the text field's first responder status.
  • Observe and react to the text field's first responder status.
  • Set the text field's placeholder.
  • Enable secure text entry.
  • Easily handle return key and delete key taps with a simple callback.
  • Style the text field using SwiftUI-style view modifiers.
  • Support for enabling and disabling the text field using the SwiftUI .disabled view modifier.
  • Configure the properties of the underlying text field using a composable text field configuration system.
  • Control over how and when text changes should be permitted.
  • Control over if the text field should begin or end editing.
  • Customise which standard edit actions are available (e.g. copy, paste).
  • Override and customise the handling of standard edit actions.

The following features are not currently supported:

  • Control over how text should be cleared.
  • Managing the text selection.
  • Any of the built-in attributed string supporting APIs.

Most UITextField APIs that are not exposed directly can be managed using the text field configuration system.

Installation

The library is made available as a Swift package and can be added to your project using Xcode's built-in package management tools.

Usage

API Documentation

Getting Started

To use ResponsiveTextField you will need to provide it with, at a minimum, a placeholder string and a Binding<String> to capture the text entered into the text field.

struct ExampleView: View {
  @State var email: String = ""

  var body: some View {
    VStack {
      ResponsiveTextField(
          placeholder: "Email address",
          text: $email
      )
    }
  }
}

Out of the box, ResponsiveTextField will fill the width of it's container and will not expand if text overflows the available space. It will also try and fill the height of its container - you can fix its height to its intrinsic content size using the .fixedSize modifier:

ResponsiveTextField(
    placeholder: "Email address",
    text: $email
)
.fixedSize(horizontal: false, vertical: true)

As the user types in the field, it will update the state that the binding was derived from.

You can enable secure text entry by passing in the isSecure property:

ResponsiveTextField(
    placeholder: "Email address",
    text: $email,
    isSecure: true
)

The isSecure property can be updated when the view is updated so it is possible to control this via some external state property, i.e. to dynamically enable or disable secure text entry.

Disabling the text field

You can disable the text field using the standard SwiftUI .disabled modifier:


ResponsiveTextField(
    placeholder: "Email address",
    text: $email
)
.disabled(true)

This uses the SwiftUI Environment system so it does not need to be called directly on the ResponsiveTextField element itself - you can also attach it to any parent view.

The disabled state can be updated and the text field will update it's state accordingly. This means you can use an @State variable to control the disabled state. No binding is required for this.

Disabling the text field will make it ignore any taps and will also resign the first responder status if the user was editing when it is disabled.

Customising the text field appearance

You can control the appearance of the text field, including it's font, text color, text alignment and return key type using custom view modifiers. These modifiers also use the Environment system so can be called on any container view as well as the text field itself. Note - these modifiers take UIKit values for fonts and colors, not SwiftUI values:

/// Sets the return key type
textField.responsiveKeyboardReturnType(.next)

/// Sets the text color
textField.responsiveTextFieldTextColor(.red)

/// Sets the font
textField.responsiveTextFieldTextColor(.preferredFont(forTextStyle: .headline))

/// Sets the text alignment
textField.responsiveTextFieldTextAlignment(.center)

Advanced re-usable configuration

For more detailed configuration, you can pass a ResponsiveTextField.Configuration value to the initialiser. This is a value type that takes a single argument, a closure of (UITextField) -> Void. This allows you to have full control over the properties of the UITextField.

Its important to note that this configuration will be called early during the makeUIView() function meaning that certain properties will be overwritten.

ResponsiveTextField(
    placeholder: "Email address",
    text: $email,
    configuration: .init {
      $0.autocorrectionType = .no
      $0.clearButtonModde = .whileEditing
    }
)

The real power of this type is the ability to create pre-defined configurations that you can re-use throughout your app. You can define these as static values in an extension on ResponsiveTextField.Configuration.

For example, we may define an email configuration that sets the keyboard type and disables autocorrection:

public extension ResponsiveTextField.Configuration {
  static let emailField = Self {
        $0.keyboardType = .emailAddress
        $0.autocorrectionType = .no
        $0.autocapitalizationType = .none
        $0.spellCheckingType = .no
        $0.clearButtonMode = .whileEditing
    }
}

You can now use this anywhere within your app in a concise way:

ResponsiveTextField(
    placeholder: "Email address",
    text: $email,
    configuration: .emailField
)

The real power is being able to create small focused configurations that do just one thing, then combining them to create higher-level configurations. For example, we could refactor the previous configuration into smaller ones and then combine them in different ways:

public extension ResponsiveTextField.Configuration {
  static let noCorrection = Self {
    $0.autocorrectionType = .no
    $0.autocapitalizationType = .none
    $0.spellCheckingType = .no
  }

  static func keyboardType(_ type: UIKeyboardType) -> Self {
    $0.keyboardType = type
  }

  static let clearWhileEditing = Self {
    $0.clearButtonMode = .whileEditing
  }

  static let emailField = .combine(
    .keyboardtype(.emailAddress),
    .noCorrection,
    .clearWhileEditing
  )

  static let passwordField = .combine(
    .noCorrection,
    .clearWhileEditing
  )
}

First Responder Control

ResponsiveTextField uses the SwiftUI binding system to give programmatic control over the first responder status of the control. This is one of the major pieces of missing behaviour from the native TextField type.

Observing the first responder state

When initialised you can pass in a callback function using the parameter onFirstResponderStateChanged: - this takes a value of type FirstResponderStateChangeHandler, which wraps a closure that will be called with the updated first responder state whenever it changes, either as a result of some user interaction or as the result of a change in the FirstResponderDemand (see below).

The first responder state is represented as a single Bool value where true indicates that the text field has become first responder and false indicates that it has resigned first responder.

struct ExampleView: View {
  var body: some View {
    ResponsiveTextField(
        placeholder: "Email address",
        text: $email,
        configuration: .emailField,
        onFirstResponderStateChanged: .init { isFirstResponder in
          // do something with first responder state
        }
    )
  }
}

If you need to track this state you can store it in some external state, such as an @State property or an @ObservableObject (like your view model):

struct ExampleView: View {
  @State
  var isFirstResponder = false

  var body: some View {
    ResponsiveTextField(
        placeholder: "Email address",
        text: $email,
        configuration: .emailField,
        onFirstResponderStateChanged: .init {
          isFirstResponder = $0
        }
    )
  }
}

If all you need to do is update some external state, you can use the built-in .updates state changed handler, passing in a binding to that state. The above example can be simplified to:

struct ExampleView: View {
  @State
  var isFirstResponder = false

  var body: some View {
    ResponsiveTextField(
        placeholder: "Email address",
        text: $email,
        configuration: .emailField,
        onFirstResponderStateChanged: .updates($isFirstResponder)
    )
  }
}

FirstResponderStateChangeHandler can also be initialised with a canBecomeFirstResponder and canResignFirstResponder closures that both return a Bool - if provided, these will be called in the text field's shouldBeginEditing and shouldEndEditing delegate calls and provide flexible control over if the text field's responder state should change. If these closures are not provided these delegate methods will return true.

Progamatically controlling the first responder state

ResponsiveTextField also supports binding-based control over the field's first responder state. To control the first responder state, you must initialise the field with a Binding<FirstResponderDemand?>:

struct ExampleView: View {
  @State
  var responderDemand: FirstResponderDemand?

  var body: some View {
    ResponsiveTextField(
        placeholder: "Email address",
        text: $email,
        firstResponderDemand: $responderDemand
    )
  }
}

Whenever the binding's wrapped value changes, it will attempt to trigger a responder state change unless the text field's current responder state already fulfils the demand. Once the demand has been fulfilled the binding's wrapped value will be set back to nil.

Becoming first responder

To make the text field become first responder, set the demand to .shouldBecomeFirstResponder. If the text field is already first responder the binding's wrapped value will be automatically set back to nil, otherwise becomeFirstResponder() will be called and the binding's wrapped value will be set to nil once the first responder state has become isFirstResponder.

Resigning first responder

To make the text field resign first responder, set the demand to .shouldResignFirstResponder. If the text field is not the first responder the binding's wrapped value will be automatically set back to nil, otherwise resignFirstResponder() will be called and the binding's wrapped value will be set to nil once the first responder state has become notFirstResponder.

Avoiding nested view updates

When using a firstResponderStateChangeHandler to update some state that triggers a view update in combination with state-driven first responder changes, it is possible to end up in a situation where you are triggering a view update in the middle of existing view update cycle which will result in a runtime warning about undefined behaviour.

This can occur because state-driven first responder changes cause the text field to become first responder as part of a view update - this means that the change handler itself will be called during that view update so if it was to trigger another view update when called, it would happen within the current view update.

In the following example, a warning would occur because the change to the @State variable results in a nested view update:

struct ExampleView: View {
  @State
  var someString: String
  
  @State
  var firstText: String
  
  @State
  var secondText: String
  
  @State
  var secondResponderDemand: FirstResponderDemand

  var body: some View {
    Text("The text is: \(someString)")
    ResponsiveTextField(
        placeholder: "First",
        text: $firstText,
        handleReturn: {
            // make the second field become first responder
            secondResponderDemand = .shouldBecomeFirstResponder
        }
    )
    ResponsiveTextField(
        placeholder: "Second",
        text: $secondText,
        firstResponderDemand: 
        onFirstResponderStateChanged: .init { _ in
          // This will be called during the view update triggered
          // by mutating `shouldBecomeFirstResponder` in the first
          // field's `handleReturn` closure.
          // This will trigger a nested state change!
          someString = "Hello World"
        }
    )
  }
}

To workaround this problem, rather than the library explicitly calling the state change handler on the next runloop tick or on an asynchronous DispatchQueue, which might not be necessary if there is no nested state change, you can avoid the problem by ensuring that the view update your state change handler triggers always happens after the view update completes.

A convenience modifier on FirstResponderStateChangeHandler, receive(on:) allows you to do this by passing in a scheduler such as a runloop or dispatch queue. The above example can be fixed with the following change to the second text field:

ResponsiveTextField(
    placeholder: "Second",
    text: $secondText,
    firstResponderDemand: 
    onFirstResponderStateChanged: .init { _ in
      // This will now be triggered on the next runloop tick and
      // will not trigger a nested state change warning.
      someString = "Hello World"
    }.receive(on: RunLoop.main)
)

Example: Using @State to become first responder on view appear

struct ExampleView: View {
  @State var email: String = ""
  @State var password: String = ""
  @State var emailFirstResponderDemand: FirstResponderDemand? = .shouldBecomeFirstResponder

  var body: some View {
    VStack {
      /// This field will become first responder automatically
      ResponsiveTextField(
          placeholder: "Email address",
          text: $email,
          firstResponderDemand: $emailFirstResponderDemand
      )
    }
  }
}

You could also trigger the field to become first responder after a short delay after appearing:

struct ExampleView: View {
  @State var email: String = ""
  @State var password: String = ""
  @State var emailFirstResponderDemand: FirstResponderDemand?

  var body: some View {
    VStack {
      /// This field will become first responder automatically
      ResponsiveTextField(
          placeholder: "Email address",
          text: $email,
          firstResponderDemand: $emailFirstResponderDemand
      )
    }
  }
}
.onAppear {
  DispatchQueue.main.asyncAfter(deadline: .now() + 1) {
    emailFirstResponderDemand = .shouldBecomeFirstResponder
  }
}

You could also use the built-in keyboard handling closure to move from one field to the next when the keyboard return button is tapped:

struct ExampleView: View {
  @State var email: String = ""
  @State var password: String = ""
  @State var emailFirstResponderDemand: FirstResponderDemand? = .shouldBecomeFirstResponder
  @State var passwordFirstResponderDemand: FirstResponderDemand?

  var body: some View {
    VStack {
      /// Tapping return will make the password field first responder
      ResponsiveTextField(
          placeholder: "Email address",
          text: $email,
          firstResponderDemand: $emailFirstResponderDemand,
          configuration: .emailField,
          handleReturn: { passwordFirstResponderDemand = .shouldBecomeFirstResponder }
      )
      /// Tapping return will resign first responder and hide the keyboard
      ResponsiveTextField(
          placeholder: "Password",
          text: $password,
          firstResponderDemand: $passwordFirstResponderDemand,
          configuration: .passwordField,
          handleReturn: { passwordFirstResponderDemand = .shouldResignFirstResponder }
      )
    }
  }
}

When using programatic responder state demands and the canBecomeFirstResponder and canResignFirstResponder closures on FirstResponderStateChangeHandler, its important to note that the latter will take priority. If either of these closures return false, the demand will be ignored and marked as fulfilled, resetting it back to nil.

Licence

This library is released under the Apache v2.0 licence. See LICENCE for details.

GitHub

link
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Last commit: 1 week ago

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Release Notes

26 weeks ago

Fixed

  • Ensure responder demand is reset on the next runloop tick to avoid a runtime error due to a nested state update.

  • Workaround for what seems to be a compiler or xccov bug that causes coverage data to become malformed when passing a reference to a super implementation in a point-free manner.

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